21355 reads  
Beautify your inner dialogue. Beautify your inner world with love light and compassion. Life will be beautiful. --Amit Ray

Eulogy Versus Resume Virtues

--by David Brooks, syndicated from awakin.org, Jul 22, 2015

About once a month I run across a person who radiates an inner light. These people can be in any walk of life. They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. You often catch them looking after other people and as they do so their laugh is musical and their manner is infused with gratitude. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all. 

When I meet such a person it brightens my whole day. But I confess I often have a sadder thought: It occurs to me that I’ve achieved a decent level of career success, but I have not achieved that. I have not achieved that generosity of spirit, or that depth of character. 

A few years ago I realized that I wanted to be a bit more like those people. I realized that if I wanted to do that I was going to have to work harder to save my own soul. I was going to have to have the sort of moral adventures that produce that kind of goodness. I was going to have to be better at balancing my life. 

It occurred to me that there were two sets of virtues, the résumé virtues and the eulogy virtues. The résumé virtues are the skills you bring to the marketplace. The eulogy virtues are the ones that are talked about at your funeral — whether you were kind, brave, honest or faithful. Were you capable of deep love?

We all know that the eulogy virtues are more important than the résumé ones. But our culture and our educational systems spend more time teaching the skills and strategies you need for career success than the qualities you need to radiate that sort of inner light. Many of us are clearer on how to build an external career than on how to build inner character.

But if you live for external achievement, years pass and the deepest parts of you go unexplored and unstructured. You lack a moral vocabulary. It is easy to slip into a self-satisfied moral mediocrity. You grade yourself on a forgiving curve. You figure as long as you are not obviously hurting anybody and people seem to like you, you must be O.K. But you live with an unconscious boredom, separated from the deepest meaning of life and the highest moral joys. Gradually, a humiliating gap opens between your actual self and your desired self, between you and those incandescent souls you sometimes meet. 




This article originally appeared in Awakin.org. Awakin.org is about deepening our self-awareness, in a community of kindred spirits. By changing ourselves, we change the world. 

David Brooks is a columnist from NY Times. The above excerpt is from his article The Moral Bucket List.



Print

Read More


Quote Bulletin


Let go, or be dragged.
Zen Proverb

Search by keyword: Happiness, Wisdom, Work, Science, Technology, Meditation, Joy, Love, Success, Education, Relationships, Life
Contribute To      
Upcoming Stories      

Subscribe to DailyGood

We've sent daily emails for over 16 years, without any ads. Join a community of 244,627 by entering your email below.

  • Email:
Subscribe Unsubscribe?


Trending DailyGoods Nov 3: Anne Lamott Writes Down Every Single Thing She Knows (163,443 reads) Nov 29: Having it Out With Melancholy (9,050 reads) Dec 4: Suiseki: The Japanese Art of Stone Appreciation (9,078 reads) Nov 19: A Lesson in Letting Go From My Mother (9,641 reads) Nov 25: The Art of Cleaning (13,910 reads)

More ...